Wednesday, 28 January 2015

GUESS PAPER - PAPER B

IMPORTANT QUESTIONS - PAPER B

1. EXPLANATION WITH RTC
1. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts,
(ii) Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven;
All is, if I have grace to use it so,
As ever in my great Taskmaster's eye.
(iii) Of Man's first disobedience, and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the World,
2. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) I may assert Eternal Providence,
And justify the ways of God to men.
(ii) Irreconcilable to our grand Foe,
Who now triumphs', and in the excess of joy
Sole reigning holds the tyranny of Heaven.
(iii) O fairest of creation! Last and best
Of all God's works!
3. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) These beauteous forms,
Through a long absence, have not been to me
As is a landscape to a blind man's eye:
(ii) Green pastures she vies in the midst of the dale,
Down which she so often has tripped with her pail;
(iii) "What occupation do you there pursue?
This is a lonesome place for one like you."
4. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) Dear God! the very house seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!
(ii) MILTON! thou should'st be living at this hour:
England had need of thee: she is fen
(iii) Turn wheresoe'er I may
By night or day,
The things which I have seen I now can see no more.
5. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) Thus ye live on high, and then
On the earth ye live again;
(ii) Ever let the Fancy roam,
Pleasure never is at home:
(iii) SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
6. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) The chief's eye flashed; but presently
Softened itself, as sheaths
A film the mother eagle's eye
(ii) Sir, 'twas not
Her husband's presence only, called that spot
Of joy into the Duchess' cheek:
(iii) O thou soul of my soul! I shall clasp thee again,
And with God be the rest!
7. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) Something sinister in the tone
Told me my secret must be known:
(ii) I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
When far away an interrupted cry
Came over houses from another street,
(iii) Two roads diverged in a wood, and I --
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
8. Explain the following lines with reference to the context.
(i) We fail?
But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we'll not fail.
(iii) Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care,
The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath,
Balm of hurt minds,
(iii) Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
The struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more
2. MACBETH BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
9. "Macbeth" As a Study of Evil
10. Moral Purpose of "Macbeth"
11. Murder Scene of King Duncan
12. Role of Supernatural in "Macbeth"
13. Macbeth As a Tragic Hero
14. Character Sketch of Lady Macbeth
15. Character Sketch of King Duncan
16. Characters of Banquo and Macduff
3. GLASS MENAGERIE BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
17. Major Themes of "The Glass Menagerie"
18. Stylistic Features of "The Glass Menagerie"
19. "The Glass Menagerie" As a Memory Play
20. "The Glass Menagerie" As a Sad and Grim Play
21. Tennessee Williams' Art of Characterization
22. Character Sketch of Amanda Wingfield
23. Character Sketch of Tom Wingfield
24. Character Sketch of Laura Wingfield
Notes Prepared By: Prof. Shahbaz Asghar
4. POETRY (MILTON, WORDSWORTH)
25. Critical Appreciation of "On His Blindness"
26. Critical Appreciation of Lines 1-26 of "Paradise Lost Book I"
27. Love of Adam for Eve in Lines 896-916 in "Paradise Lost Book IX"
28. Milton's Grand Style
29. Wordsworth's Love of Nature
30. "Tintern Abbey Revisited" As a Masterpiece of Nature Poetry
31. Critical Appreciation of "Ode on Intimation of Immorality"
32. Critical Appreciation of "The Reverie of Poor Susan"
5. POETRY (KEATS, BROWNING, FROST)
33. Keats As a Lover of Beauty and Nature
34. Keats As a Writer of Odes
35. Critical Appreciation of "Ode to Autumn"
36. Robert Browning As a Dramatic Poet
37. Browning's Optimism
38. Critical Appreciation of "Incident of the French Camp"
39. Poetic Qualities of Robert Frost
40. Critical Appreciation of "Bereft"

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